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Default 08-31-2012, 02:52 PM

He is quite funny actually. Anar al Islam got exterminated. The Peshmerga defeated them twice in 2003 and again in 2007 when they tried to reestablish themselves. Their leader is too scared to come out of his in Norway because ordinary Kurds want to exterminate him too, and infact he is on a death sentence in Kurdistan which is why Norway wont deport him.

If he talks too much I'll just remind how 11 of their leaders were publicly executed in Erbil and remind him of the parties that were to follow.
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Default 08-31-2012, 03:51 PM

Anyways back to the topic. Some pictures of South Kurdistan.

Slemani









Hawler.











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Default 08-31-2012, 05:37 PM

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Originally Posted by kurd123 View Post
He is quite funny actually. Anar al Islam got exterminated. The Peshmerga defeated them twice in 2003 and again in 2007 when they tried to reestablish themselves. Their leader is too scared to come out of his in Norway because ordinary Kurds want to exterminate him too, and infact he is on a death sentence in Kurdistan which is why Norway wont deport him.

If he talks too much I'll just remind how 11 of their leaders were publicly executed in Erbil and remind him of the parties that were to follow.


If i could i would enlist myself with the Turkish army to bomb some Kurdish terrorists and snipe them,but too busy with studies.

Peshmerga is in power just because the U.S wants them,but as soon as they are annoyed with you forget your dreams of a national army.

They have been terrorizing the locals it is fact ask common kurds from Naynavah and to the north in Sulemaniyah.

They are worse than al Qaeda and equal to Hitlers SS.

Kurd have many similarities with Afghans,a beautiful language,own culture...but yet they ruin their picture with nationalism most of those living abroad.


That is why i support Turkish army war on PKK terrorists and Kurdish nationalism.

Be happy with what you have but don't jeopardize your situation in Iraq,how much change it has resulted after Saddam Al Husain al Tikriti. ( no doubt i liked and like Saddam).


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Reinforcement of the Kurdish forces in Musul (Mosul), where US is preparing for a second operation after Felluce (Fallujah), caused anxiety among the city locals.
According to the Reuters' news, Kurdish forces in the structure of the Iraqi National Guards are sent to Musul (Mosul) via northern cities, Dohuk and Erbil. Number of those forces reached 1,800 in Mosul US military sources say. Reuters commented about the developments, "Local population worry about the widening of Kurdish influence towards that city." Abed Ranam, who is from Mosul, said: "Nobody here wants Kurdish army. There are Kurds living in the city for hundreds of years. There is no problem about that; however, we do not want the Kurdish army."

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The Kurdish peshmerga terrorize young
Assyrian in Tel-Kef Iraq

Kurdish militia force of KDP is often used as an instrument to interfere in the internal affairs of the Assyrians, to impose Kurdish hegemony over the region, through random terrorism and intimidating the unarmed population.
March 29,2007

In the early hours of March 22/2007 a Kurdish militia force of the KDP forcefully abducted a young Assyrian man James Al-Bazi.The young man was forced out of his house in the Tel-Kef district and savagely taken to the peshmerga headquarters where he was blindfolded and beaten up for an hour and a half by a group of the peshmerga before he was released later on in the morning.
The real reasons behind the incident are still unknown but some had said that a scuffle took place between the young man and his friend and that the latter had complained to the Kurdish militia.However,there isn't any convincing reason for such brutal acts against the Assyrian people at the hands of the Kurdish militia because solving scuffles and small arguments isn't their job in the areas where the Assyrian inhabitants live,otherwise what is the role of the Iraqi police in Tel-Kef and the rest of the areas of the Nineveh Plains when it's being greatly undermined and in a disturbing manner at the hands of the intruding Kurdish militias.
This incident wasn't the first but rather such incidents had been escalating in particular against the young people in Tel-Kef and other areas of the Nineveh Plains,where it was mentioned that three other young men were subjected to similar treatment under the pretence of not having their identity cards in narrow alleys and near homes.
Assyria National Assembly (c) 2007 All Rights Reserved
Source: Nirgalgate
English:http://assyrian4all.net/akhne/viewtopic.php?t=1780
Arabic:http://assyrian4all.net/akhne/viewtopic.php?t=1779


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Default 08-31-2012, 05:41 PM

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SPEAKING FREELY
A farewell to Iraqi arms?
By Stanley A Weiss

Speaking Freely is an Asia Times Online feature that allows guest writers to have their say. Please click here if you are interested in contributing.

LONDON - Amid the carnage and chaos of Iraq, a well-armed militia is the closest thing any ethnic, religious or tribal group thinks it can have to an insurance policy for its own survival. But as each bombing and assassination pushes Iraq deeper into all-out sectarian war, Iraqis are learning an old lesson of multi-ethnic societies - private armies organized in the name of self-preservation only risk ensuring their own destruction.

For Iraq's Sunni minority, the insurgency remains their bargaining chip for regaining a slice of the power they enjoyed under Saddam



Hussein. But each new attack only risks a Shi'ite-Sunni civil war - one that the vastly outnumbered Sunnis would surely lose.

Among the Shi'ite religious parties, the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq wields the paramilitary Badr Brigade, armed by Tehran's Revolutionary Guards. But a campaign of assassination and torture against Sunnis - reportedly by the Badr-controlled Interior Ministry - only hardens Sunni resolve to resist Shi'ite rule.

By repeatedly unleashing his Mahdi Army against coalition forces, the young firebrand cleric Muqtada al-Sadr has become Iraq's leading hardline Shi'ite nationalist. But by clashing with rival Badr forces and forging tactical alliances with Sunnis, Sadr has added to his list of mortal enemies.

Finally, the Kurds of northern Iraq, with their 100,000 peshmerga fighters, may finally fulfill their dream of independence. But reports of peshmerga terrorizing Arabs and Turkmens in multi-ethnic cities such as Mosul and Kirkuk risk intervention by Turkish or international forces.

Though comforting to their brethren, these private armies deprive Baghdad of a basic tenet of any sovereign state - a monopoly on the use of coercive force. So how can Iraq avoid the fate of such countries as Lebanon, Sri Lanka and even Pakistan, where powerful militias, rebels and warlords function as states-within-a-state? Or Bosnia-Herzegovina, where Muslims, Croats and Serbs still hunker down behind their own armies?

A survey of insurgencies and civil wars around the world shows that armed groups can be demobilized, disarmed and reintegrated into civilian life - provided the new insurance they're offered is better than the old militia they have.

No compromise, no peace. Successful demobilizations start with a broader political settlement that addresses core grievances. In the tsunami-ravaged Indonesian province of Aceh, rebels have given up their fight for independence in exchange for greater autonomy and a larger share of oil and gas revenues. In Macedonia, ethnic-Albanian rebels laid down their arms after being promised new protections for their culture and language.

The lesson for Iraq: Sunnis are unlikely to be pacified until the country's de-Ba'athification policy is eased to afford them a greater political voice and until the constitution is amended to give them a more equitable distribution of oil revenues.

Reconciliation, not retribution. From El Salvador to Sierra Leone, war-torn countries have often forged a more peaceful future by pardoning the past. In Colombia, more than 10,000 right-wing paramilitaries have disarmed under the promise of full or partial amnesty. Iraqis should embrace the proposal of outgoing president Jalal Talabani - general amnesty for insurgents, except for foreign jihadists such as Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.

Farewell to arms
There are several ways that Baghdad could gain better command and control of militias and disarm rebel groups. For Shi'ites and Kurds in the new Iraqi Army who remain loyal to their Shi'ite and Kurdish masters, Baghdad should consider Afghanistan's New Beginnings program, which seeks to break the chain of command between soldiers and warlords through retraining and a stronger defense ministry.

For the Kurdish peshmerga, an unlikely model is Kosovo, where the ethnic-Albanian rebels of the Kosovo Liberation Army have been converted into a lightly armed civil defense corps under North Atlantic Treaty Organization supervision, but which Kosovars see as the future army of an independent state. Although the peshmerga will surely resist disarming, even temporarily, such a defense corps could make Kurdish independence more palatable to Turkey, Iran and Syria, each with their own restive Kurds.

For the Sunni insurgency and Sadr's Mahdi Army, a money-for-guns program could offer each fighter a cash incentive for disarming. To avoid repeating the mistakes of Nicaragua and Liberia, where fighters turned disarmament into a business that fueled more violence, Baghdad might replicate another initiative in Afghanistan that offers public-works projects to communities where militias give up their guns.

To rebuild trust among Iraqis, gunmen would surrender weapons under foreign monitors, similar to the commission that last year verified the disarming of the Irish Republican Army. For militias that did not disarm voluntarily, government forces should disarm them forcibly, as the army of the Democratic Republic of Congo is now doing with help from United Nation forces.

Ultimately, the successful demobilization of Iraqi militias will depend on their reintegration into society. As part of the peace accord that ended 11 years of civil war, Sierra Leone provided more than 75,000 former fighters vocational training or tuition-free education. When UN peacekeepers left this month after a six-year mission, the rehabilitation of rebels was credited with sustaining peace in the war-ravaged country.

Sooner or later, Iraqis will realize that their militias don't provide the insurance they advertise. If later, Shi'ites, Sunnis and Kurds alike will pay a heavy price in a catastrophic sectarian war. If sooner, all Iraqis could find even greater security in the many models for turning soldiers back into civilians.

Disarming sooner also has its risks. But, in the end, it is the only premium worth paying.

Stanley A Weiss is founder and chairman of Business Executives for National Security, a non-partisan organization based in Washington. This is a personal comment.

Speaking Freely is an Asia Times Online feature that allows guest writers to have their say. Please click here if you are interested in contributing.
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Default 08-31-2012, 06:41 PM

afg2010. oppression breeds nationalism, oppression based on other peoples nationalism breeds even more extreme nationalism. when several countries have stepped on kurdish rights based on arab or turkish nationalism, what do you expect of the kurds? in a dreamland it would be easy to say well hey we are all muslim so lets get along and hug, but thats not the case. the pashtuns of the paki tribal belt have not has it as bad as the kurds but you still find time to defend ttp's ridiculous anti islamic atrocities or at least make light of it while carefully not condemning them.

if afghanistan were to not exist and the pashtun nation was split into several countries where pashtun culture is a punishable crime, we would have an even more extreme reaction to it than kurds ever have.

i think ethnic nationalism is stupid but it is understandable because of history. at least these kurds have the good sense not to slaughter each other like pashtuns are doing.


There is nothing in our book, the Qur'an, that teaches us to suffer peacefully. Our religion teaches us to be intelligent. Be peaceful, be courteous, obey the law, respect everyone; but if someone lays a hand on you, send him to the cemetery. That's a good religion.

- Malcolm X
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Default 08-31-2012, 07:21 PM

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Originally Posted by Afghanistan2010 View Post
If i could i would enlist myself with the Turkish army to bomb some Kurdish terrorists and snipe them,but too busy with studies.
Go to Turkey then. If the kemalist/Nationalist Turks don't kill you in Western Turkey, the Kurds will in Eastern Turkey.

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Peshmerga is in power just because the U.S wants them,but as soon as they are annoyed with you forget your dreams of a national army.
Says the inbred with the IQ of a cat.

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They have been terrorizing the locals it is fact ask common kurds from Naynavah and to the north in Sulemaniyah.
Nineveh? Funny. Kurds and Christians in Ninenveh request Kurdish presence. I'm From slemani. Who the hell are you? some radical retard, I swear to god if you ever step foot in Kurdistan people will ride you like the donkey you are.

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They are worse than al Qaeda and equal to Hitlers SS.
And who the hell are you?

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Kurd have many similarities with Afghans,a beautiful language,own culture...but yet they ruin their picture with nationalism most of those living abroad.
Are you retarded? We have similarities with Afghans, maybe. But not you! you are a complete inbred retard and I don't care if the admins ban me. YOU ARE A RETARD. I bet your parents are brother/sister.

What the hell do you know about Kurds or Kurdistan? let me enlighten you stupid fool.

The result was an overwhelming majority of 98.8% favoring an independent Kurdistan.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraqi_K...ferendum,_2005

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That is why i support Turkish army war on PKK terrorists and Kurdish nationalism.
Islamic radical stupidity has no bound. Turkey and the Israeli army coperate on every level. The Turkish army is part of NATO and is hosting the NATO missile shield.

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Be happy with what you have but don't jeopardize your situation in Iraq,how much change it has resulted after Saddam Al Husain al Tikriti. ( no doubt i liked and like Saddam).
The man you like was found in a hole like a rat and was hanged like one too.

As for your quotes. Funnily enough, a stupid radical such as yourself probably doesn't even know what "Assyrians" are. They are Iraqi Christians, commonly butchered by your favorite group Ansar al Islam. Yet, when it fits you, you'll use them as a source. How stupid can you be?

Last edited by kurd123; 08-31-2012 at 07:24 PM.
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Default 08-31-2012, 07:26 PM

Just to add: You're using sources from 2007, even Turkey is taking Kurdistans side in Iraq now. But, you're too stupid and are probably living in a cave.
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Default 08-31-2012, 07:31 PM

2010 reminds me of a mentally disturbed teen, who sits behind a computer, slobbering over photos and videos of slaughter and death, having bloodlust fantasies, and is actually a total wimpy nerd.
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Default 08-31-2012, 07:34 PM

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Originally Posted by faye View Post
2010 reminds me of a mentally disturbed teen, who sits behind a computer, slobbering over photos and videos of slaughter and death, having bloodlust fantasies, and is actually a total wimpy nerd.
Reminds me of a complete retard that can't comprehend the most basic information. He loves the Turks, people I have lived among. You don't know what they truly think of afghans, infact afghans are commonly used as insults by them.
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Default 09-02-2012, 05:58 PM

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Originally Posted by Khostai View Post
Kurdish peopel look beautiful, much better than the arabs LOL.
After so much opression from the turks and arabs they still have kept there culture alive. Thats a good point about them.
And Kurd123 don't listen to this Afghanistan2010, he is not Afghan he is Punjabi from Pakistan. Thats why I call him Punjabi2010
Most kurds look like turks and arabs mixed though heh
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