View Full Version : 'Shaming' her in-laws costs 19 year old her nose, ears


Talal
03-18-2010, 10:44 PM
These barbarians, they call themselves freedom fighters, call themselves muslims ?! this is so shameful

http://cnnafghanistan.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/t1larg-bibi.jpg?w=640

"When they cut off my nose and ears, I passed out," 19-year-old Bibi Aisha of Afghanistan says with chilling candor.

Her beauty is still stunning and her confidence inspiring. It takes a moment for the barbaric act committed against her to register in your mind and sight.

Wearing her patterned scarf and with roughly painted nails she shares her story.

"It felt like there was cold water in my nose, I opened my eyes and I couldn't even see because of all the blood," she remembers.

It was an act of Taliban justice for the crime of shaming her husband's family.

This story began when Aisha was just 8 years old.

Her father had promised her hand in marriage, along with that of her baby sister's, to another family in a practice called "baad."

"Baad" in Pashtunwali, the law of the Pashtuns, is a way to settle a dispute between rival families.

At 16, she was handed over to her husband's father and 10 brothers, who she claims were all members of the Taliban in Oruzgan province. Aisha didn't even meet her husband because he was off fighting in Pakistan.

"I spent two years with them and became a prisoner," she says. (Watch more of the interview with Aisha)

Tortured and abused, she couldn't take it any longer and decided to run away. Two female neighbors promising to help took her to Kandahar province.

But this was just another act of deception.

When they arrived to Kandahar her female companions tried to sell Aisha to another man.

All three women were stopped by the police and imprisoned. Aisha was locked up because she was a runaway. And although running away is not a crime, in places throughout Afghanistan it is treated as one if you are a woman.

A three-year sentence was reduced to five months when President Hamid Karzai pardoned Aisha. But eventually her father-in-law found her and took her back home.

That was the first time she met her husband. He came home from Pakistan to take her to Taliban court for dishonoring his family and bringing them shame.

The court ruled that her nose and ears must be cut off. An act carried out by her husband in the mountains of Oruzgan where they left her to die.

But she survived.

And with the help of an American Provincial Reconstruction Team in Oruzgan and the organization Women for Afghan Women (WAW), she is finally getting the help and protection she needs.

Offers have been pouring in to help Aisha, but there are many more women suffering in silence.

The United Nations estimates that nearly 90 percent of Afghanistan's women suffer from some sort of domestic abuse. This in a country where there are only about eight women's shelters to provide sanctuary from the cruelty they face. And all of the eight are privately run.

"Bibi Aisha is only one example of thousands of girls and women in Afghanistan and throughout the world who are treated this way - who suffer abuses like this, like this and worse," says board member for WAW, Esther Hyneman.

In 2001, the situation of Afghan women and Taliban brutality received plenty of attention. Now organizations like WAW say the international community is strangely silent on the issue.

Hyneman says not enough is being done to help the women in Afghanistan and that feeds into the hands of the insurgency.

"When you have ... 50 percent of a population on their knees, it's very easy for extremists, tyrants to take over a country," she adds. "They have a ready-made enslaved population."

Aisha is reminded of that enslavement every time she looks in the mirror.

But there still times she can laugh. And at that moment you see her teenage spirit escaping a body that has seen a lifetime of injustice.

bulletsar
03-18-2010, 10:46 PM
Wow that is so sad :(
Thanks for posting though.

Roshina
03-19-2010, 01:50 AM
Depressing and heartbreaking! ... but not surprising.

She must be a hell of a confident and strong girl if she survived all this time! Bravo to her!

pir_Rokhan
03-19-2010, 08:16 PM
LOOK WHAT IS HAPPENING IN THE ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF PAKISTAN.

Credere you cannote hide yourself.I know you as well as others who are here to defend the collapsing Punjabi empire by creating hatred and differences between the Muslims of Afghanistan and to divide the Afghans.I know when it comes to Afghanistan you forget ISLAM.

The filthy Punjabi forums are already full of this bull**** contaminated propaganda against Afghans and Pashtuns.You are just adding to it.Your CM , leadership and nation all have been exposed and their venomous designs against Pakhtuns are now talk of the town.Even the PPP opposed the racist remaks of Abid ali of PML N in the NA.

What a shame.

************************************************** *****************
Man butchers his four daughters in Pakistan

ISLAMABAD - A labourer slit throats of his four daughters in Pakistan’s eastern Punjab province when his eldest daughter married of her own choice, a news report said on Sunday.

The Daily Times said Nazeer Ahmed, a resident of Burewala town of Punjab, committed the crime late Saturday while girls were sleeping at home.

“He brought his married daughter Muqaddas Bibi, 25, home from her in-laws. They had dinner and when all girls slept, he butchered them with sharp knife,” senior police officer, Mukhtar Iqbal Tikka told the newspaper.
Tikka said the labourer killed his unmarried daughters who were 6, 10 and 12 years old out of fear that they would follow their elder sister.

Ahmed told police that his eldest daughter tarnished the family’s honour by having married on her own choice.

For human rights groups, violence against women is a growing concern in the male-dominated Pakistani society, where females are killed by their male relatives for disgracing their family’s honour by marrying of her own choice rather than accept an arranged mating.

Daughters and sisters are also given in marriage to rivals for settlement of disputes.

Even though President General Pervez Musharraf publicly declared ”honour killing” a crime, the independent Human Rights Commission of Pakistan says more than 750 such murders occurred within last 18 months.

Talal
03-19-2010, 08:31 PM
yes your right porkhan we punjabs are all inhuman savages, i hope you sleep happy

Back to the topic, these honour killings and this savageness needs to stop, i hope this man gets shot in the face. Oh and porkhan you might wanna look up Pakistan's constition regarding "honour killings", its punishable by death and oh wait what is this ? the same law applies to all of PAKISTANIS !

Master Khan
03-20-2010, 03:56 PM
I can people would do these horrible acts.
I won't even do that to a Animal, these people are Khanzeeran and dalagan.

tor_khan
03-20-2010, 05:42 PM
LOOK WHAT IS HAPPENING IN THE ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF PAKISTAN.

Credere you cannote hide yourself.I know you as well as others who are here to defend the collapsing Punjabi empire by creating hatred and differences between the Muslims of Afghanistan and to divide the Afghans.I know when it comes to Afghanistan you forget ISLAM.

The filthy Punjabi forums are already full of this bull**** contaminated propaganda against Afghans and Pashtuns.You are just adding to it.Your CM , leadership and nation all have been exposed and their venomous designs against Pakhtuns are now talk of the town.Even the PPP opposed the racist remaks of Abid ali of PML N in the NA.

What a shame.

************************************************** *****************
Man butchers his four daughters in Pakistan

ISLAMABAD - A labourer slit throats of his four daughters in Pakistan’s eastern Punjab province when his eldest daughter married of her own choice, a news report said on Sunday.

The Daily Times said Nazeer Ahmed, a resident of Burewala town of Punjab, committed the crime late Saturday while girls were sleeping at home.

“He brought his married daughter Muqaddas Bibi, 25, home from her in-laws. They had dinner and when all girls slept, he butchered them with sharp knife,” senior police officer, Mukhtar Iqbal Tikka told the newspaper.
Tikka said the labourer killed his unmarried daughters who were 6, 10 and 12 years old out of fear that they would follow their elder sister.

Ahmed told police that his eldest daughter tarnished the family’s honour by having married on her own choice.

For human rights groups, violence against women is a growing concern in the male-dominated Pakistani society, where females are killed by their male relatives for disgracing their family’s honour by marrying of her own choice rather than accept an arranged mating.

Daughters and sisters are also given in marriage to rivals for settlement of disputes.

Even though President General Pervez Musharraf publicly declared ”honour killing” a crime, the independent Human Rights Commission of Pakistan says more than 750 such murders occurred within last 18 months.

I'm surprised Pir Rokhan Jaan, that you should fall into your own trap. You point to a previous post by a forum contributor as an example of somebody who is out to divide and in the process bad name Pashtoons. In the process you react by pulling in an example of abuse against women committed in the Panjaab. You use this as a line of defence to point out that Pashtoons are not the only ones who commit crimes against women.

At the same time you appear to think that Khaled Hosseini has the right to perpetuate crude stereotypes about Pashtoons in your defence of this book. See http://www.pashtunforums.com/showpost.php?p=3627&postcount=37

I'm trying to make sense of how you feel about both issues here now, but I'm still not sure.

Dinosaur Khan
03-20-2010, 05:58 PM
Pashtuns, punjabis or sindhis whoever are commiting these horrible crimes in the name of honour are condemnable.

pir_Rokhan
03-20-2010, 06:39 PM
1) I'm surprised Pir Rokhan Jaan, that you should fall into your own trap. You point to a previous post by a forum contributor as an example of somebody who is out to divide and in the process bad name Pashtoons. In the process you react by pulling in an example of abuse against women committed in the Panjaab. You use this as a line of defence to point out that Pashtoons are not the only ones who commit crimes against women.

2) At the same time you appear to think that Khaled Hosseini has the right to perpetuate crude stereotypes about Pashtoons in your defence of this book. See http://www.pashtunforums.com/showpost.php?p=3627&postcount=37

I'm trying to make sense of how you feel about both issues here now, but I'm still not sure.

Tor Khana wrora
You jumped to conclusion too early.My intention to post that was not to defend the inhumane act committed by that man but to show mirror to the malicious designs of the enemies of Pashtuns diguising in various nicks to hide their reality.I wanted to tell them that not to forget the brutalities of their own people during their negative propaganda about Pashtuns.

I dint defend khalid huseini book.I think that :

Firstly, it was just a novel not some research thesis / project.

Secondly, its the world of academia.One novel has to be challenged by another novel,one research by another,one movie by another movie and so on.

Its just a story.No character can and should represent the good or the bad of any nation.Its just jumping to conclusion and over speculation and over sensitivity on our part.

If someone thinks this I think it is lack of acquaintance with the world of literature.Literature is a spectrum and has all colors.We are used to test everything in terms of jurisprudence.This is unfortunate.

First I think no novel qualifies to aim at maligning a nation and even if it does genuinly,then criticism is a way to progress ,prosperity and perfection.So we should not be afraid of it reserving the right to respond in case anyhting goes out of limits.

The "good and bad" are nothing except the remenaissance of the tribal,agrarian,machine,industrial ages in history.With the passage of time and with the advancement of technology.terms are redefined and all these narrow prejudices will wither away.How genius was Einsten to have told humanity that everything was relative.

tor_khan
03-20-2010, 07:08 PM
Tor Khana wrora
You jumped to conclusion too early.My intention to post that was not to defend the inhumane act committed by that man but to show mirror to the malicious designs of the enemies of Pashtuns diguising in various nicks to hide their reality.I wanted to tell them that not to forget the brutalities of their own people during their negative propaganda about Pashtuns.

Not for a second was I suggesting that you were defending the man! Not at all. perhaps that's been misunderstood here.

The comparison is about smear/stereotyping, which you and I feel are similar in intent - they are about creating a world view of Pashtoons that is warped.

I dint defend khalid huseini book.I think that :

Firstly, it was just a novel not some research thesis / project.

Secondly, its the world of academia.One novel has to be challenged by another novel,one research by another,one movie by another movie and so on.

Its just a story.No character can and should represent the good or the bad of any nation.Its just jumping to conclusion and over speculation and over sensitivity on our part.

Trust me, as I sit here from my position in the middle east (and I trust that you will trust me on this one!) No amount of 'balanced' academia changes how people feel about general topics - whether its about global warming, water shortages, Pashtoons or anything else. What matters (particularly in the West) is what the popular media/Hollywood depicts. If the tide is against Pashtoons in the popular media, then ideas are fixed. When the mujahideen were the darlings of the west, then whether they turned up in the cinema, drama, books, magazines etc. - fictional depictions showed Pashtoons as brave warriors fighting in the name of freedom etc.

Just how quickly the media turns around. It is fed by its contributors, Hosseini included and it doesn't matter if it's fiction. It sticks. I have very few opinions on Hosseini as a writer and I can take the criticism. However, what I am aware of, is that his "fiction" is taken as "fact" by the popular media and this reinforces the campaign against us.

To be honest, the academics haven't changed that much - Pashtoons are still the same people they were 20, 30 years ago, 100, 200 years ago. We're all a little war weary at this time and slightly more displaced than we've ever been in our history, but the academics don't dwell on this. The popular media does and there-in are the stories of our faults.