View Full Version : History of Tandoor


Karachi
05-26-2011, 04:59 PM
A tandoor (Azerbaijani (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azerbaijani_language): Təndir, Turkish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_language): Tandır, Arabic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_language): تنور‎, Punjabi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punjabi_language): ਤੰਦੂਰ, Persian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian_language): تنور, Hindi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindi_language): तन्दूर, Urdu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urdu): تندور, Bengali (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bengali_language): তন্দূর, Armenian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_language): Թոնիր) is a cylindrical clay oven (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oven) used in cooking and baking. The tandoor is used for cooking in Azerbaijan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azerbaijan), India (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/India), Turkey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkey), Iran (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran), Armenia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenia), Pakistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pakistan), Uzbekistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uzbekistan), Afghanistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afghanistan), the Balkans (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balkans), the Middle East (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_East), Central Asia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Asia) as well as Burma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burma) and Bangladesh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangladesh).[ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tandoor#cite_note-Raichlen-0)

The tandoor is used for cooking certain types of Iranian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iranian_cuisine), Afghan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afghan_cuisine), Pakistani (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pakistani_cuisine) and Indian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_cuisine) foods such as tandoori chicken (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tandoori_chicken), chicken tikka (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_tikka) and bread varieties like tandoori roti (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roti) and naan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naan).[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tandoor#cite_note-1) The word tandoori is the adjective meaning "pertaining to the tandoor" and is used to describe a dish cooked in a tandoor. The tandoor was popularised during Muslim (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muslim) reign in South Asia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Asia). It is thought to have travelled to Central Asia and the Middle East along with the Roma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romani_people) people, who originated amongst the Thar Desert tribes. In India, the tandoor is also known by the name of bhatti. The Bhatti tribe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhatti_tribe) of the Thar Desert (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thar_Desert) of northwestern India and eastern Pakistan developed the Bhatti in their desert abode, and thus it gained the name.[citation needed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed)] The tandoor is currently a very important fixture in many Pakistani (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pakistani)/Indian restaurants (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_restaurant) around the world. Some modern day tandoors use electricity or gas instead of charcoal

The oldest examples of a tandoor were found in the settlements of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indus_Valley_Civilization) in Pakistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pakistan), though earlier tandoor type ovens have been recovered in early-Harappan contexts on the Makran (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Makran) coast, including the mound site of Balakot (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balakot), Pakistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pakistan). In Sanskrit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanskrit), the tandoor was referred to as kandu. The word tandoor comes from the Dari (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dari_(Eastern_Persian)) words tandūr and tannūr; these are derived from very similar terms, viz. Persian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian_language) tanūr (تنور), Armenian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_language) "t’onir" (Թոնիր), Arabic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_language) tannūr (تنّور), Turkish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_language) Tandır, Azeri (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azerbaijani_language) təndir and Kurdish tendūr (which all have the same meaning as explained in the article). However, according to Dehkhoda Persian Dictionary (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dehkhoda_Dictionary) the word originates from Akkadian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akkadian_language) tinūru, and is mentioned as early as in the Akkadian Epic of Gilgames (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epic_of_Gilgames) (as reflexed by Avestan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avestan) tanūra and Pahlavi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoroastrian_Middle_Persian) tanūr). As such, tandoor may not be originated from Semitic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semitic) or Iranian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iranian_languages) altogether, dating back to periods before the migration of Aryan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aryan) and Semitic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semitic) people to the Iranian plateau (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iranian_plateau) and Mesopotamia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesopotamia).

graveyardofempires
05-26-2011, 05:00 PM
Persian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian_language): تنور
?

BS
pashto it says tanoor in persian it says tandoor

faye
05-26-2011, 07:51 PM
fresh made bread from these ovens is delicious. whilst in iran i would buy some every morning.

faye
05-26-2011, 08:26 PM
this thread must be up twice????????

rhiza
06-02-2011, 09:30 PM
Thanks for sharing the history of tandoor, I love the tandoori chicken,,love the yogurt and the spices so much..:evilgrin: